Tag Archives: Melbourne

Makatron – ‘In Ten Cities’


Ten years in the making this book brings you visual intensity from one of the most travelled and dedicated artists of Melbourne – Mike Makatron.

Featuring murals, canvas, installations and sculpture works plus behind the scenes images and tongue in cheek quirky stories from the streets to the jungles in over 50 diverse locations from around the world.

New York, Singapore, Miami, Melbourne, Mexico City, Sao Paulo, Cape Town, Rio De Janeiro and Berlin are just some of the places featured in this visual journey through the colourful life of Mike Maka.

To celebrate the launch of the book, head on down to Chopper Lane / Everfresh Studio
1 Perry Street, Collingwood 3066 on Friday 4th December 201 from 6pm.


Fintan Magee – ‘Water World’


Fintan Magee first became involved in Brisbane’s thriving graffiti scene in the late 1990s. An interest in painting gradually led Fintan to break away from traditional graffiti lettering and move towards figurative painting and street art. Even before obtaining his Bachelor degree in Fine Arts in 2009, Fintan was well on his way towards becoming one of the world’s most renowned street artists.

Fintan’s success has in part been due to his prolific global campaign of impressive murals and in part due to the emotional depth of his subject matter, which explores contemporary social issues with a relatable subtlety, through muted colours and elements of the mundane.

Fintan’s artwork depicts the relationship between man, nature and civilisation. His murals, which are often in industrial or low-income areas, tell stories of struggle, loss, migration and hope. Fintan’s artwork, on either walls or canvas, expertly presents universal struggle and hope from a personal perspective.

Water World

Since the 2011 Brisbane floods, which razed large areas of Fintan’s home town, Fintan has been focused on exploring the human cost of environmental issues and disasters.

Embarking on a series of large murals in Russia, Ukraine, Ireland, UK, Germany, Tunisia, Indonesia, Belgium, Norway, US, Mexico, Colombia, Hong Kong, China, Argentina and New Zealand, Fintan has explored concepts of resilience and hope across the world. During his travels the concepts behind his murals have expanded to include his observations on the lives of people living in poverty, of refugees and the effects of climate change.

His global painting campaign established Fintan as one of the world’s leading street artists while providing him with a platform to refine his message and technique. From December 2015 at Backwoods Gallery, Fintan will be presenting the culmination of his experiences in an exhibition titled Water World.

Water World is a collection of 13 paintings, presented along side a large central installation and a collection of studies. It will be on display from the 4th to the 13th of December.

Opens Friday Dec 4th from 6-10pm and continues until Dec 13th
Backwoods Gallery, 25 Easey St, Collingwood, VIC

VNA 32 is here!

VNA 32 is hot off the press!


Our much-celebrated cover is from Japanese-American artist Audrey Kawasaki. A firm favourite of ours for a long time, she blends together a beautiful mix of delicate female forms with a dark manga influence. Incorporating Art Nouveau-inspired pattern work, wood grain and soft colours with subtly tortuous and erotic undertones her exotic hyperrealism is otherworldly.


This issue’s Diggin’ In The Crates sees the return of the hugely talented Jeff Soto to give us the rundown on some of the highlights of his extensive career and some of the directions he has explored over the course of his professional life.


Cute French couple Ella & Pitr give us a glimpse of their amazing partnership of eight years, showing how they double up on their creativity, travelling worldwide to paint while still holding it down as parents.


Dipping deep into the Antipodean pond, we look at the amazing, huge murals of Aussie, Fintan Magee and look through the refined lens of Nicole Reed’s camera. While we’re out that way we also hunker down with New Zealander Askew to chat about Pacific Island life and world politics.


Our main men in London, photographers Claude Crommelin, Mark Rigney of Hookedblog, NoLionsInEngland, and Paul Gray stomp the streets of London to find the finest examples of art in the streets, while Paul Green covers the Bristol scene to shine a light on the West Country.


The regular Instagram feature throws a spotlight on the slick snaps of Australian photographer, p1xels, with a nice mix of urban exploring, graffiti, architecture, inside and outside art and street scenes.


Mr Penfold holds it down for the UK, with his cartoon-style and colours as he gains confidence in his abstract illustrations. Also from the UK, we have fine pencil work from Steph Morris, getting freaky over sneakers as she shares her obsession.


Repping it hard for the girls, Polish painter Natalia Rak demonstrates her enviable skills across multiple mediums, from canvas to concrete.


We go through the looking glass to view art from the other side with Patrick Hull of Chicago-based Vertical Gallery in our Gallery Talk feature. Staying in the US, we also have man of the land, Spencer Keeton Cunningham, with his blend of skate styles and doodled motifs. And last but not least, heading further north, we check in with Canadian Sandra Chevrier and her awesome mix of comic book and photorealistic portraiture.


All in, there’s plenty to shout about and more than enough to fill the pages of our bigger-sized pages. Get yours online and in store now.


‘Be Civilised’ – Shawn Lu and Kitt Bennett

Screen shot 2015-11-22 at 3.53.34 PM

Be Civilised is a collection of ink works on paper, by Kitt Bennett and Shawn Lu. The works are a documentation of the artists’ perceived representations of culture and the human experience that comes with it.

Kitt Bennett creates humorous instances that focus on our materialistically driven society, steadfast in its ways and blindly expanding with little regard for the consequences. Themes of consumerism and assimilation add to the storytelling in an attempt to realise new perspectives on our lives.

Shawn Lu’s work explores imagined myths and urban legends perpetuated by the human condition, through modern machinery coupled with nineteenth-century medievalism. Vague narratives of a second dark age which is paradoxically documented through the artwork, include monuments and technology that are repurposed, and their original intentions and meaning forgotten.

The works allow a glimpse into the uncertainties that surrounds us, serving as a reminder to always be civilised.


The Arts Hole – ‘REPEAT’


Opening its doors in the suburbs of Melbourne in 2011, The Arts Hole studio has, over the years, grown to become one of the most innovative and expressive artistic collectives within Australia.

Having produced the amazing Paterson Project in early 2015, the Arts Hole are no strangers to grand events. This time around, they’ve assembled a whole slew of artists from both within the studio, as well as a bunch of friends and extended Artsholian family, for their annual group show – REPEAT.

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Ken Taylor x Screaming Hand

jim phillips

Ken Taylor is a Melbourne based poster artist and illustrator. For the past 10 years Ken has focussed on creating striking screenprinted rock posters for film studios and some of the worlds biggest bands, including Queens of the Stone Age, Metallica, Pearl Jam, Nine Inch Nails, Kings of Leon, Bob Dylan and The Rolling Stones.

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand? Where does it take you back to?

Ken Taylor: My first memory of the screaming hand was probably when i was 12/13 and sated to get into skating which eventually lead me towards graff. It takes me back to drawing that hand over and over again on school folders, my old yellow canvas school bag, files, pencil cases – pretty much any item I owned that was meant to stay neat and tidy was covered in the hand an a bunch of other 80’s skate graphics.

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Ben Brown x Screaming Hand


Ben Brown’s illustrations have been proliferated through an extensive range of publications, apparel companies and music industry commissions. His work has featured in Rolling Stone magazine, has promoted performers including Nirvana and Pearl Jam and his graphics continue to be sought after by clients such as Hurley and Mambo.

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand? Where does it take you back to?

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Travis Price x Screaming Hand

Travis Price is an award winning Commercial Illustrator based in Australia working primarily in Vector. Price was heavily influenced by skateboard and t-shirt graphics of the late 80’s and these early influences can be seen through is ever expanding folio of work. The last decade has seen Price work with some of the world’s leading apparel brands including Rebel8, Nike, Converse, Neff, and Johnny Cupcakes…

travis price piece

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand? Where does it take you back to?

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Marian Machismo x Screaming Hand


Marian Machismo believes that ghosts exist and that 90s pop songs will outlive us all. She believes that a day doesn’t start before the second cup of coffee and that the solution to most problems can be found by looking at the sky. She believes in the transformative nature of art and the benefits of a stiff drink to calm the nerves.

In her usual way, she took the concept of an interview and ran with it. We take great pleasure in sharing her thoughts with you below:

Photo: p1xels

Growing up in the body of a socially awkward girl on a commune in the middle of nowhere surrounded by nothing provided the younger version of myself three very important life lessons. Firstly the innate knowledge that I would never be cool, not at least until well after high school when the hormones had relinquished control, allowing conversation to emerge. Secondly and I should add that this was learnt in the aforementioned later teens, having experienced very little by way of popular culture and having never surfed or skated or undergone any life changing experience thus allowing me to wax lyrical in any entertaining or captivating way, that there is in fact very little to talk about. Thirdly and by far more important in the scheme of things is the understanding that regardless of age, experience, location, social status and language there exists a cannon of symbols that unite us. Within these symbols lie a universal understanding of experience, energy and creation. Music is one of these symbols, as is art. This seems obvious but stay with me… I remember the Nokia 3310. I remember it with more detail then my first kiss, my first cigarette or the first time I fell off my Girlfriends Skateboard in a mess of hair, limbs and feelings. I remember it because it symbolized freedom. Or at least as far as I understood it to be and after enduring weeks of teenage phoneless angst I finally hit my limit and approached the parental figures. This was met with blood boiling laughter. I was then promptly gifted a palm sized piece of rose quartz, a loosely worded statement about contacting beings on different plains of conciseness and ushered along. Why did I need a phone? Who was I going to call? How was I planning on charging it? I digress, this wasn’t the first or last time I felt like I was missing out on being part of something bigger than myself. I don’t remember the first time I saw the Screaming hand, within my lifetime it has practically always existed. Like a secret code that once cracked would provide the tools required to experience true freedom. It was a secret language spoken by tanned surfers and rad skaters and understood by only the top tier of cool and then slowly it grew and with it grew a generation, technologically mobilized and hungry for symbolic importance. Conversations were carried with Simpson’s references, Seinfeld one-liners and the understanding that we were all part of something bigger. Jim Phillips created something previously unheard of; he built a bridge and in doing so allowed the pasty pale plebs a way to get over it. Surfers talk about the calm of the ocean or the powerful and mystic beauty of nature or whatever but for me making art, creating conversation with and about personal experiences and connecting with others through this is the rumble of the wild. The understanding that everything is connected and lines and barriers can be crossed, crossed out and then crossed again. Being asked to be part of a show like this would be cool for any artist but for the quiet, lonely child inside me it is my Mecca and its with great pleasure that I hold my head up high and say to the Heathers that made my formative years hell ‘Sit and Spin Baby, Sit and Spin’ #nailedit



George Rose x Screaming Hand


George Rose is often mistaken for a boy. She is actually a visual artist with a flair for not taking life too seriously. She spends most of her time up ladders painting murals and sometimes makes it into her studio just to try something a bit more normal. She feels most as home with a paintbrush in hand but also likes the feel of a pen, spray can, drill or Wacom tablet.

Since graduating George has thrown caution to the wind and abandoned her formal design training opting to pursue a multidisciplinary art practice. She has spent the last several years pretending to be a gypsy, rarely in one city for longer then a few months completing art commissions for clients in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Canberra. George had her first solo shown at Nishi Gallery and since has exhibited in group shows such as Curvy World Exhibition at aMBUSH Gallery Sydney, Uncommon Places, a part of Melbourne Fringe Festivals keynote event Melbourne, Bright Side Exhibition at The Chop Shop Canberra, Jannet Clayton Gallery Sydney and worked with various festivals including: You Are Here Canberra, ArtNotApart Canberra and This Is Not Art Newcastle to name a few. She has also completed several residencies creating murals with teens at the Bimberi Youth Justice Centre and is currently the artist in residence at Red Bubble Melbourne.

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