Tag Archives: hip hop

Sin Cru – Sinstitute of Hip Hop Arts

Internationally recognised arts organisation SIN Cru return during the Easter Holidays to present the fifth Sinstitute of Hip Hop Arts. Join them to help celebrate their fifteenth year providing Easter HipHop fun & activities to the community.

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Jun Inoue – KUH at Backwoods

Jun Inoue was raised in regional Kanagawa, Japan, where he studied Shodō (traditional Japanese calligraphy). His grandfather, a Zen Monk, became a major influence on his philosophy and aesthetic vision. Upon moving to Tokyo, the energy of the city’s underground – jungle, hip-hop and most importantly, graffiti – played a major role in further shaping his aesthetic development.

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Carbon – Saturday Round Up

Barry McGee was possibly the highlight of the day; after bailing on everyone (including Acclaim) for his press appointments in order to get his daily dose of surf, the reclusive artist came through with a somewhat unorthodox presentation. Predictably focusing on graffiti, he skittered through a slide show that was basically the equivalent of a graff-heads porn collection, interspersed with wavy anecdotes and comments from an alternate reality.

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The Q&A for Forum B raised some interesting notions on social media and new technology from Geoffrey Lillernon, which made his actual seminar presentation seem washy and self-indulgent in its focus, which was primarily aimed at his own personal, whimsically rebellious art-house projects.

Mark Drew’s passion for hip hop and little insights into his own personal life made for an entertaining show, focusing on his recent ‘Deez Nuts’ project and zine and the subsequent ongoing legal fallout – offering to give us some creative input further down the line, ‘from jail’.

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Shawn Stussy was the star of the show in Forum A, with pretty much the entire room bowing in deference to one of the self-acknowledged O.G.’s of the streetwear. His verbose concerns of anyone wanting to be involved with his new S-Double label seemed to ring a little hollow. Like, I’m pretty sure it’s a safe bet NO-ONE will be interested in any new projects from one of the forefathers of the scene. After a 15 year break. It’s not like that’s a fashionista’s wet dream or anything…

We caught up with Booooooom.com founder, Jeff Hamada for a little sociological take on his own particular platform (more to come on this one)

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Ronnie Fieg provided an amusingly anecdotal floor with his stories about growing up as a young, jewish kid from Queens, who now champions Asics after his mother failed to buy him the trendiest kicks of which he dreamed. The 30 year-old has sacrificed marriage and kids to follow his dream (but probably not skimped on fun and girls along the way, one suspects…)

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Sneaker Freaker founder, Simon ‘Woody’ Wood, was probably the most legit talker of the day. No doubt this guy has one of the most prodigiously in-depth knowledges of trainers in the world – both Ronnie Fieg and PM Tenore asked for his confirmation during their speeches – and his chat was definitely on point today; the main message being do what you love, the rest will follow…

Dabs Myla, the sole incarnation of two souls bound in love and creativity, were the epitome of a duo so profoundly intertwined, they made Batman and Robin look like enemies. The cute couple spent their time finishing each others sentences and providing an insight into what really makes a partnership tick – trust, honesty, hard work and knowledge. Keep it locked for a more in-depth update from these guys.

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www.weareallcarbon.com

Cross Words

Steve Cross is a multi-talented artist, working across many mediums, including spraypaint, pencil and tattoos. Originally from Perth, Wild Western Australia, he now resides in Melbourne, where he co-runs Korpus Tattoo Studio. We caught up with the all-round b-boy for a chat about his murky past and inky fingers.

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Tell us about your studio, Korpus…

Korpus was founded in 2007, in Brunswick, Melbourne. My good friend, Brian Graydon, and I came up with the concept of an art studio that would also run as a tattoo studio. We figured that if we exposed new images, ideas and concepts to people, we’d break away from that clichéd idea of what a tattoo and a tattoo studio should be. We hoped customers would respond with more of an open mind, which, in turn, would expand the possibilities of what they would want, and what we could illustrate on them. To start with, it was tough, as, initially, we learnt how to tattoo for 12 years, but now we were thrown into the business side of things. Five years on, we have great artists working with us, and we’ve had some amazing people come through. All the people who work, or have worked, at Korpus have been artists that Brian and I have looked up to and wanted to either nurture or learn from.

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End Of Days – Days Oner

Days is one of the sickest artists out there with a spraycan; wildstyle is in his blood, along with a healthy dose of irreverence, a love for hip hop, original graffiti culture and classic cars. We managed to pull in an interview with him as he prepares for his entry into the upcoming Sidewayz show…

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Skel – Can you kick it?

Melissa ‘Skel’ Jaksic is a legend. She recently painted Oxford Art Factory alongside Shannon Crees, Alex Lehours, Anthony Lister and Sprinkles for the VNA launch in Sydney. Her creative projects include work for Absolut, Outpost, Paste Modernism and Secret Wars (now Secret Walls). She also helps run Ben Frost’s online print store, Stupid Krap, in her spare time. We caught her in between beers for a look at how she gets her kicks…

‘Skel’ means, basically, a bit of a lowlife, is that your persona as an artist, or your representation of what artists can be?

I got the nickname Skel from one of my crackhead friends back in my hometown. Because, at the time, I was a bit skinny and I guess they thought they were being crafty, seeing as I was Skeleton-like and it rhymed with Mel. It wasn’t until one of my friends linked me to the definition of Skel on Urban Dictionary that I saw it had all these alternate worldly meanings that, funnily enough, still applied to me as a person. I think everyone has the capacity to be a bit of a lowlife, and my work generally focuses on the darker side of people’s psyches, so I guess Skel is more a representation of what people can and sometimes want to be, but can’t because of societal pressures. The Dr. Jekyll to my Mr. Hyde I guess…

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