Tag Archives: ambush gallery

Printed Matters Sydney – Shepard Fairey

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Printed Matters is an ongoing series of exhibitions, focusing on the importance of printed material in Shepard Fairey’s art. Each exhibition highlights the significance by incorporating a variety of Fairey’s printed material, including serigraphs on paper, editions on wood, editions on metal, and fine art collage. New works are added for each venue, making each Printed Matters exhibition a unique experience. Beginning in 2010, the Printed Matters platform was first presented in Los Angeles, and for its next instalment will exhibit in Sydney at The Old Rum Store in the Kensington Street Precinct in Chippendale (Sydney), on view from Saturday, 17 June – Sunday, 9 July 2017.

Fairey is known around the world for his iconic imagery; whether it’s the Barack Obama HOPE poster, his evolving sticker campaign, or his brand OBEY. He will be appearing as a keynote Game-Changer speaker for Vivid Ideas, as well as painting his largest mural ever, located at 309 George Street. In addition, he currently has a free public exhibition at the Darling Quarter precinct entitled ‘Revolutions’.

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photo: Nicole Reed (@nicasa) for T-world (@eddiezammit)

“I can’t imagine my art practice without the influence of, and the use of, printing. Some of my biggest art influences were not paintings, but printed things like album covers, skateboard graphics, punk flyers, and T-shirt designs … Some people say print is on its way out, that it will be wiped out by digital media, but I say you can never replace the provocative, tactile experience of an art print on the street or in a gallery. Printing still matters.” Shepard Fairey

In addition to the exhibition, T-world is releasing two exclusive T-shirts to commemorate the show and Fairey’s tour as an official OBEY x T-world collaboration. The limited- edition T-shirts are exclusive to the event and only available at the pop-up gallery, reflecting the ethos of T-world’s “Print is Premium” stance.

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@obeygiant

@eddiezammit

@nicase

@ambushgallery

@vividsydney

Metro Luminescence

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Witness art from open spaces brought inside as 13 diverse artists swap the streets for a gallery.

On Saturday 11 June, aMBUSH gallery is bringing art from the outside in. Thirteen artists with a connection to the streets unveil their work in a gallery setting, challenging themselves in a new environment and giving viewers an insight into the process of work that’s normally created in changing conditions and extremes. Whether in the shadows of midnight or in broad daylight, in the driving rain or scorching sun, these graffiti writers, muralists, fine artists, photographers, and sculptors demonstrate it’s about more than just the practice and the place; it’s about the outcome.

Curated by Australian multi-disciplinary and previously featured artist Phibs this group show features work from Andrew Jumbo, Chris McGeown, George Rose, GT Sewell, Lucy Lucy, Nico, Nicole Reed, p1xels, Peque, Phibs, Pudl, Snarl and Stabs.

Ben Brown x Screaming Hand

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Ben Brown’s illustrations have been proliferated through an extensive range of publications, apparel companies and music industry commissions. His work has featured in Rolling Stone magazine, has promoted performers including Nirvana and Pearl Jam and his graphics continue to be sought after by clients such as Hurley and Mambo.

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand? Where does it take you back to?

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Travis Price x Screaming Hand

Travis Price is an award winning Commercial Illustrator based in Australia working primarily in Vector. Price was heavily influenced by skateboard and t-shirt graphics of the late 80’s and these early influences can be seen through is ever expanding folio of work. The last decade has seen Price work with some of the world’s leading apparel brands including Rebel8, Nike, Converse, Neff, and Johnny Cupcakes…

travis price piece

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand? Where does it take you back to?

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Marian Machismo x Screaming Hand

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Marian Machismo believes that ghosts exist and that 90s pop songs will outlive us all. She believes that a day doesn’t start before the second cup of coffee and that the solution to most problems can be found by looking at the sky. She believes in the transformative nature of art and the benefits of a stiff drink to calm the nerves.

In her usual way, she took the concept of an interview and ran with it. We take great pleasure in sharing her thoughts with you below:

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Photo: p1xels

Growing up in the body of a socially awkward girl on a commune in the middle of nowhere surrounded by nothing provided the younger version of myself three very important life lessons. Firstly the innate knowledge that I would never be cool, not at least until well after high school when the hormones had relinquished control, allowing conversation to emerge. Secondly and I should add that this was learnt in the aforementioned later teens, having experienced very little by way of popular culture and having never surfed or skated or undergone any life changing experience thus allowing me to wax lyrical in any entertaining or captivating way, that there is in fact very little to talk about. Thirdly and by far more important in the scheme of things is the understanding that regardless of age, experience, location, social status and language there exists a cannon of symbols that unite us. Within these symbols lie a universal understanding of experience, energy and creation. Music is one of these symbols, as is art. This seems obvious but stay with me… I remember the Nokia 3310. I remember it with more detail then my first kiss, my first cigarette or the first time I fell off my Girlfriends Skateboard in a mess of hair, limbs and feelings. I remember it because it symbolized freedom. Or at least as far as I understood it to be and after enduring weeks of teenage phoneless angst I finally hit my limit and approached the parental figures. This was met with blood boiling laughter. I was then promptly gifted a palm sized piece of rose quartz, a loosely worded statement about contacting beings on different plains of conciseness and ushered along. Why did I need a phone? Who was I going to call? How was I planning on charging it? I digress, this wasn’t the first or last time I felt like I was missing out on being part of something bigger than myself. I don’t remember the first time I saw the Screaming hand, within my lifetime it has practically always existed. Like a secret code that once cracked would provide the tools required to experience true freedom. It was a secret language spoken by tanned surfers and rad skaters and understood by only the top tier of cool and then slowly it grew and with it grew a generation, technologically mobilized and hungry for symbolic importance. Conversations were carried with Simpson’s references, Seinfeld one-liners and the understanding that we were all part of something bigger. Jim Phillips created something previously unheard of; he built a bridge and in doing so allowed the pasty pale plebs a way to get over it. Surfers talk about the calm of the ocean or the powerful and mystic beauty of nature or whatever but for me making art, creating conversation with and about personal experiences and connecting with others through this is the rumble of the wild. The understanding that everything is connected and lines and barriers can be crossed, crossed out and then crossed again. Being asked to be part of a show like this would be cool for any artist but for the quiet, lonely child inside me it is my Mecca and its with great pleasure that I hold my head up high and say to the Heathers that made my formative years hell ‘Sit and Spin Baby, Sit and Spin’ #nailedit

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@marianmachismo

George Rose x Screaming Hand

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George Rose is often mistaken for a boy. She is actually a visual artist with a flair for not taking life too seriously. She spends most of her time up ladders painting murals and sometimes makes it into her studio just to try something a bit more normal. She feels most as home with a paintbrush in hand but also likes the feel of a pen, spray can, drill or Wacom tablet.

Since graduating George has thrown caution to the wind and abandoned her formal design training opting to pursue a multidisciplinary art practice. She has spent the last several years pretending to be a gypsy, rarely in one city for longer then a few months completing art commissions for clients in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Canberra. George had her first solo shown at Nishi Gallery and since has exhibited in group shows such as Curvy World Exhibition at aMBUSH Gallery Sydney, Uncommon Places, a part of Melbourne Fringe Festivals keynote event Melbourne, Bright Side Exhibition at The Chop Shop Canberra, Jannet Clayton Gallery Sydney and worked with various festivals including: You Are Here Canberra, ArtNotApart Canberra and This Is Not Art Newcastle to name a few. She has also completed several residencies creating murals with teens at the Bimberi Youth Justice Centre and is currently the artist in residence at Red Bubble Melbourne.

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Luca Ionescu x Screaming Hand

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Luca Ionescu is Sydney based typographer, designer, artist and curator
with a range of local and international commercial clients. Luca is also
the owner of Like Minded Studio, renowned for their logo and typography
work, which has been documented in numerous publications and online. His
long list of curatorial work through refilL magazine and beyond has
brought a range of established international artists to Australian shores
as well as showcasing established and emerging local talent. Like Minded
Studio studio has received international awards and recognition from the
New York Type Directors Club, D&AD, and Cannes Lions.

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand? Where does it take you
back to?

Luca Ionescu: The graphic for me has its earliest roots round 1990, the fam was living
in Fairfield an outer suburb of Sydney. That summer all the local kids
would be building our own make shift ramps to launch from at home and if
at all possible making a trip across town to get together at the large
vert ramp at Fairfield Pool, which attracted a congregation older
skaters from all around showing off their skills, whilst the youngsters
would sit gazing in awe as if upon some idol skate gods. The 7 ply
objects of desire were adorned in Santa Cruz & Peralta graphics. The
rendering and detail on Jim Phillips speed wheels is the earliest memory
of spotting the screaming hand along w the dope vains making the
lettering out the back wrapping round the wheel.

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Nicole Reed x Screaming Hand

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Melbourne-based, award winning photographer Nicole Reed proclaims that, for her, photography is more than just a career – it’s her reason for living.

Rarely leaving the house, never mind the country, without her camera, Nicole is proud to have been bitten by the travel bug and searches for the muse of her next frame around every corner. While her work is undoubtedly artistic, Nicole draws inspiration from editorial, documentary and reportage photography, but above all, travel.

Along with her versatile and adaptive style of portrait photography, Nicole has a niche talent for capturing urban environments, giving way for her to produce truly iconic image collections. Her documentation of urban sprawl, decay and abandon shows not only her sheer motivation for social commentary but also her innate ability to source beauty in places overlooked by the untrained eye. Shooting a fine balance of derelict and disused environments across the globe, including Indonesia, Japan, USA and her backyard of Australia, Nicole’s images dictate a combined set of emotions – a sense of mourning and celebration for what these places once were.

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand? Where does it take you back to?

Nicole Reed: I grew up in a country town, on a steep hill, and for some crazy reason our parents let my younger brother (by 2 years), Adam, and myself skateboard down the hill in the middle of the road on our banana boards. I have a few scars still from this period in my life! A little later on when we were older (mid mid to late 80’s) my brother built a half pipe in our backyard, it was just below my bedroom window and we used to play bands like The Dead Kennedys and Suicidal Tendencies from our cassette players out the window. I used to sit and watch them skate, take polaroids and listen to music. This was my first memory of skate graphics and the Screaming Hand. While I was still only skating down the hill on my banana board I remember being fascinated by the boys boards and the designs they choose. It reminds me of being young, carefree, warm and unafraid of being hurt.

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Cat Wall x Screaming Hand

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Cat Wall is difficult to Google. She is a Melbourne-based artist and copywriter. Born and bred in the world’s most isolated city, she made the East coast shuffle in late-2012, where she kicked off on her current path – a career that, much like the girl herself, can be described as short, creative and somewhat overwhelming. Cat’s illustration work ranges from intricate hand-drawn ink work to digital illustration and hand-painted murals. In her spare time she listens to soft folk covers of Miley Cyrus songs and adds to her list of potential names for dogs she is yet to own.

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand?

Cat Wall: The Screaming Hand is older than I am, but I grew up with two skate-obsessed older brothers, so Santa Cruz, the hand, the entire culture – it’s something that’s been present in my life since I was a kid, pouring hours into California Games on NES and quite literally eating gravel after bailing on tricks beyond my capability. Continue Reading →

Beastman x Screaming Hand

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Bradley Eastman (aka Beastman) is a multidisciplinary artist from Sydney, Australia. Influenced by the design aesthetics and repetitive patterns found in nature, Beastman’s detailed, organic, colourful and geometric artworks depict a futuristic world of new life, growth, hope and survival. The instantly recognisable deities in the works have spawned from the elements of the earth, as if nature has come to life in a way we could never have imagined. One of the most distinctive and prolific emerging contemporary artists in Australia, one third of creative group The Hours and co-founder of East Editions, Beastman has exhibited extensively throughout Australia, as well as in the UK, USA, Germany, Indonesia, Hong Kong and New Zealand. He has curated and organised numerous art exhibitions and projects, has worked with various brands including Element, Colab, Stone & Wood, Hyundai, Sony, Mini, Facebook, Capsule and Smirnoff. Beastman was named Best Artist at the 2010 Sydney Music, Arts & Culture (SMAC) Awards and his large solo and collaborative mural works can be found all over Australia and in the UK, Europe, USA, Asia and the Middle East.

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand? Where does it take you back to?
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