Tag Archives: above

NoLionsInEngland opens our eyes to Reykjavik street art & graffiti

VNA’s good friend and long time photo contributor NoLionsInEngland came back from a recent trip to Reykjavik with such stunning photos of the local graffiti that we devoted a whole glorious seven pages of issue 19 of VNA to Reykjavik graffiti. NoLions has written an article for us to supplement that photo feature, and he has thrown in a whole different bunch of photographs of the awesome Reykjavik graff scene to compliment those in issue 19, which is available from our shop. Get ready to be shocked and amazed.

Expectations of Iceland are framed by volcanoes, glaciers, sea life and thermal baths but not necessarily graffiti. As the airport bus meandered tight streets disgorging short stay tourists, down a side street the elevation of one building revealed a top to bottom London Police. Where did that come from?! This stunning end elevation set the scene for unexpected discoveries almost everywhere we turned.


London Police, Sara Riel, Nomad, Above

More after the drop….
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Global Gallery Auction

Global Gallery, Sydney, present the Gala Auction. Works up for grabs include paintings, prints and sculptures from some of the worlds most iconic artists, rising stars and renowned street artists. With over 150 artworks up for sale from over 80 different artists, it promises to be a big night in a fresh space.

Featuring work from Anthony Lister, Ben Frost, Inkie, Ha Ha, Meggs, E.L.K, Beastman, Damien Hirst, Above, Bridge Stehli, Shannon Crees, Robin John, Justin Feuerring and more, the auction is currently previewing. Drinks start from 5pm and bidding kicks off at 6.30pm, Tuesday 24th April at Global Gallery. Phone bids and absentee bids will also be available for those unable to attend.

Global Gallery
5 Comber St
Paddington
Sydney
NSW
2021
www.globalgallery.com.au/

Above working streets of Paris

A new piece poped up by this Californian artist who spend many years living and working in France. This is how he describes his latest creation:

Last year I was traveling for 3-months around Europe and spent 2 weeks in Paris. One day when I was walking around Paris I found this spot but unfortunately I had just 1 day before my flight to Rome. After observing the large concrete frame on the wall, it gave me a lot of inspiration for several ideas on how to creatively interact with the un-used frame and location. One idea was to juxtapose an “art thief” stealing a popular painting like the Mona Lisa from the frame. I felt the idea and site-specific stencil would interact well with the un-used frame and the fact that the Mona Lisa is located just 10 minutes away inside the Louvre museum.

Time always changes things and with that new situations arise. Since last year when I was in Paris I’ve noticed a lot of new topics in street art and more importantly the thievery of art works in the street. I felt it more interesting and relative to have the art thief portrayed in the stencil stealing a piece of art that actually gets stolen quite often. The English artist Banksy is one of the most popular street artists and highly publicized victims of his street artworks being stolen. It’s not by random chance this happens to Banksy’s art as first and foremost he makes great work but also due to the fact that his indoor works have sold for several hundred thousand dollars you can imagine when he paints outside in the street his works are soon sought after by thieves.

It’s an interesting concept and somewhat of an irony as we the artists and the thieves are both working in an illegal manner. One illegal activity inspires another. The artist paints illegally with spray cans on a wall, while the thieves jack hammer and chip off illegally painted walls, illegally. It’s kind of like the pot calling the kettle black to a degree.
I took the initiative to comment and create a situation in this piece that could mimic both illegal acts simultaneously executed here in the painting and in the process.

Many years ago before Banksy’s mass appeal he painted his popular rat image that read, “Because I’m worthless.” Times have changed Banksy is a common household name as well as the increased value of his artworks. I felt like it would be applicable to the current state of affairs to appropriate his previous statement to “Because now I’m worth it” to reflect the past and current thievery of his street artworks.

“A lot of people never use their initiative because no-one told them to”
Banksy

“BECAUSE NOW I’M WORTH IT” from ABOVE on Vimeo.