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Over the last few years the Australian street art scene has exploded with amazing work from local and international talent. This in turn has inspired hundreds of photographers to find creative ways to capture the evolution the Australian streets. In 2015 Chasing Ghosts are calling on the photographers of Australia to submit their favourite single shot as part of “That One Shot” Australia’s first street art photography award.

In this years competition, photographers from across Australia will go head to head to see who can claim the 2015 title!!

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Montana Cans x Futura x ACRONYM

On November 17th, iconic graffiti artist FUTURA turned 60. To celebrate his birthday and decades worth of artistic output, MONTANA-CANS have created a special colourway, the FUTURA 2000 Black, as part of their Iconic Series. For the global pre-launch, FUTURA asked his friends at ACRONYM® to collaborate on an exclusive design to appear on the can, produced in a limited run and for this occasion only.


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Ken Taylor x Screaming Hand

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Ken Taylor is a Melbourne based poster artist and illustrator. For the past 10 years Ken has focussed on creating striking screenprinted rock posters for film studios and some of the worlds biggest bands, including Queens of the Stone Age, Metallica, Pearl Jam, Nine Inch Nails, Kings of Leon, Bob Dylan and The Rolling Stones.

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand? Where does it take you back to?

Ken Taylor: My first memory of the screaming hand was probably when i was 12/13 and sated to get into skating which eventually lead me towards graff. It takes me back to drawing that hand over and over again on school folders, my old yellow canvas school bag, files, pencil cases – pretty much any item I owned that was meant to stay neat and tidy was covered in the hand an a bunch of other 80’s skate graphics.

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Marian Machismo x Screaming Hand


Marian Machismo believes that ghosts exist and that 90s pop songs will outlive us all. She believes that a day doesn’t start before the second cup of coffee and that the solution to most problems can be found by looking at the sky. She believes in the transformative nature of art and the benefits of a stiff drink to calm the nerves.

In her usual way, she took the concept of an interview and ran with it. We take great pleasure in sharing her thoughts with you below:

Photo: p1xels

Growing up in the body of a socially awkward girl on a commune in the middle of nowhere surrounded by nothing provided the younger version of myself three very important life lessons. Firstly the innate knowledge that I would never be cool, not at least until well after high school when the hormones had relinquished control, allowing conversation to emerge. Secondly and I should add that this was learnt in the aforementioned later teens, having experienced very little by way of popular culture and having never surfed or skated or undergone any life changing experience thus allowing me to wax lyrical in any entertaining or captivating way, that there is in fact very little to talk about. Thirdly and by far more important in the scheme of things is the understanding that regardless of age, experience, location, social status and language there exists a cannon of symbols that unite us. Within these symbols lie a universal understanding of experience, energy and creation. Music is one of these symbols, as is art. This seems obvious but stay with me… I remember the Nokia 3310. I remember it with more detail then my first kiss, my first cigarette or the first time I fell off my Girlfriends Skateboard in a mess of hair, limbs and feelings. I remember it because it symbolized freedom. Or at least as far as I understood it to be and after enduring weeks of teenage phoneless angst I finally hit my limit and approached the parental figures. This was met with blood boiling laughter. I was then promptly gifted a palm sized piece of rose quartz, a loosely worded statement about contacting beings on different plains of conciseness and ushered along. Why did I need a phone? Who was I going to call? How was I planning on charging it? I digress, this wasn’t the first or last time I felt like I was missing out on being part of something bigger than myself. I don’t remember the first time I saw the Screaming hand, within my lifetime it has practically always existed. Like a secret code that once cracked would provide the tools required to experience true freedom. It was a secret language spoken by tanned surfers and rad skaters and understood by only the top tier of cool and then slowly it grew and with it grew a generation, technologically mobilized and hungry for symbolic importance. Conversations were carried with Simpson’s references, Seinfeld one-liners and the understanding that we were all part of something bigger. Jim Phillips created something previously unheard of; he built a bridge and in doing so allowed the pasty pale plebs a way to get over it. Surfers talk about the calm of the ocean or the powerful and mystic beauty of nature or whatever but for me making art, creating conversation with and about personal experiences and connecting with others through this is the rumble of the wild. The understanding that everything is connected and lines and barriers can be crossed, crossed out and then crossed again. Being asked to be part of a show like this would be cool for any artist but for the quiet, lonely child inside me it is my Mecca and its with great pleasure that I hold my head up high and say to the Heathers that made my formative years hell ‘Sit and Spin Baby, Sit and Spin’ #nailedit




We Create Live is an on-going series of events that host some of the UK’s most talented artists, showcasing their skills live for the audience to enjoy.

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The next We Create Live event will be held at Kachette, East London, on Wednesday 11th November from 7pm till midnight. Painting live on the night will be:

Miss Led, Kid Acne, Mr Jago, China Mike, O.Two, Florence Blanchard and Ryan Kai

Entry is FREE but strictly limited to guest-list only. Get your free tickets and place on the guest list at

Kachette, 347 Old Street, London, EC1V 9LP

Nicole Reed x Screaming Hand

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Melbourne-based, award winning photographer Nicole Reed proclaims that, for her, photography is more than just a career – it’s her reason for living.

Rarely leaving the house, never mind the country, without her camera, Nicole is proud to have been bitten by the travel bug and searches for the muse of her next frame around every corner. While her work is undoubtedly artistic, Nicole draws inspiration from editorial, documentary and reportage photography, but above all, travel.

Along with her versatile and adaptive style of portrait photography, Nicole has a niche talent for capturing urban environments, giving way for her to produce truly iconic image collections. Her documentation of urban sprawl, decay and abandon shows not only her sheer motivation for social commentary but also her innate ability to source beauty in places overlooked by the untrained eye. Shooting a fine balance of derelict and disused environments across the globe, including Indonesia, Japan, USA and her backyard of Australia, Nicole’s images dictate a combined set of emotions – a sense of mourning and celebration for what these places once were.

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand? Where does it take you back to?

Nicole Reed: I grew up in a country town, on a steep hill, and for some crazy reason our parents let my younger brother (by 2 years), Adam, and myself skateboard down the hill in the middle of the road on our banana boards. I have a few scars still from this period in my life! A little later on when we were older (mid mid to late 80’s) my brother built a half pipe in our backyard, it was just below my bedroom window and we used to play bands like The Dead Kennedys and Suicidal Tendencies from our cassette players out the window. I used to sit and watch them skate, take polaroids and listen to music. This was my first memory of skate graphics and the Screaming Hand. While I was still only skating down the hill on my banana board I remember being fascinated by the boys boards and the designs they choose. It reminds me of being young, carefree, warm and unafraid of being hurt.

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Cat Wall x Screaming Hand


Cat Wall is difficult to Google. She is a Melbourne-based artist and copywriter. Born and bred in the world’s most isolated city, she made the East coast shuffle in late-2012, where she kicked off on her current path – a career that, much like the girl herself, can be described as short, creative and somewhat overwhelming. Cat’s illustration work ranges from intricate hand-drawn ink work to digital illustration and hand-painted murals. In her spare time she listens to soft folk covers of Miley Cyrus songs and adds to her list of potential names for dogs she is yet to own.

Damo: What’s your first memory of the Screaming Hand?

Cat Wall: The Screaming Hand is older than I am, but I grew up with two skate-obsessed older brothers, so Santa Cruz, the hand, the entire culture – it’s something that’s been present in my life since I was a kid, pouring hours into California Games on NES and quite literally eating gravel after bailing on tricks beyond my capability. Continue Reading →

p1xels x Screaming Hand

Photo: p1xels

To celebrate the launch of “Thirty Years of the Screaming Hand: A tribute to the artist Jim Phillips” opening tomorrow night at Sydney’s aMBUSH Gallery (and next week at Melbourne’s SoHigh Galley), our Australian correspondent, Damo, has teamed up with curator Eddie Zammit to bring you a selection of interviews with some of the Australian talent involved with this epic show.

“The Screaming Hand is a timeless illustration. The fact is, 30 years after Jim Phillips created it, it’s more popular than ever. The artists chosen reflect diverse backgrounds and prove that there is power in the most universally recognised skate symbol ever. For the Australian part of the show, I wanted to showcase how creative and innovative our country is.” – Eddie Zammit

To begin it seems right to introduce you to p1xels. p1xels has documented 20 artists documenting their creative process for the show.

For the uninitiated, p1xels is a Melbourne-based photographer whose subculture-specific photo documentation of the graffiti scene has spanned over seven years. She has worked with highly regarded local and international artists, documenting public aerosol art, as well as capturing its illegal side.

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Lush in Hosier Lane…


After a sold out show in Melbourne’s Hosier Lane, everyone’s favourite vandal, and recent Banksy collaborator, Lush has launched a limited selection of originals through Backwoods Gallery. For more info contact

Check below to see what went down at the show!

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