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‘FACING DECONSTRUCTION’ by Unwell Bunny

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‘FACING DECONSTRUCTION’ by Unwell Bunny is somewhat of a self-portrait for Unwell Bunny otherwise known as Ed Bechervaise. It represents a point of reflection both on himself and the urban art movement he has a lengthy relationship with. Captured are faces of Ed’s contemporaries, mentors, figure heads and the new breed of an independent disestablishment art movement.

‘FACING DECONSTRUCTION’ opens at Backwoods Gallery on October 20th from 6pm. Visit the exhibition page for more information. In the lead up to the show, Ed sat down with Damo….

Damo: We’ve finally managed to actually speak in person! Could we just start with who is ‘Unwell Bunny’ and how do you describe your current style?

Unwell Bunny: Unwell Bunny is kind of like my second artistic incarnation; an incarnation of Ed Bechervaise and my first graffiti name in Adelaide that I ran for about seven years. Moving to Melbourne I felt the need to reemerge in a slightly different form and Unwell Bunny was the reemergence. It came from a comic book that I did very early on in about 2002 or 2003 whilst I was actually witnessing the Melbourne street art boom happening. I had not quite ten years’ graffiti heritage and the street art boom was just completely new and I’d never experienced anything like that before. So, Unwell Bunny is the reincarnation of my graffiti past in a new form which has gone on to resemble urban contemporary art -giving me another sphere to project myself beyond my own name.

This allows the work to have secondary perspective on things and that works quite well for me. Keeping my name as a part of the linkage to my artistic practice with Unwell Bunny being an easier vehicle to move forward with.

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‘Content by the Kilo’ – Callum Preston

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‘Content by the Kilo’ is Callum Preston’s first venture north to exhibit artworks from his home town of Melbourne, with Church Brisbane being the perfect venue considering his history creative visual work in the music industry.

The artworks are a collection of what he calls ” fast and loose” butchers shop signs, the kind of thing you would have seen as a kid while shopping with a parent, proclaiming the finest cuts, the cheapest prices or the freshest produce. Big bold and eye catching, from a time before social media, you wanted to say something, you wrote it down and put a splash of neon around it.

Callum sat down with Damo over at Everfresh Studios to have a yarn about his show and what else is happening in his world.

Damo: Thanks for taking the time to hang out today. Can you introduce yourself and talk about your various artistic practices?

Callum: My name is Callum Preston I am based out of Everfresh Studios in Collingwood (Melbourne, Australia). I’ve been part of Everfresh since around 2004/2005 when I was a lot younger. I’m currently 33 and I’m a full-time… I don’t really have a full-time title but I’m sort of a full-time artist / designer / sculptor. It’s kind of very blurry; basically I’ll have a go at anything. That’s sort of my motto. I have just come to accept that I don’t really like the ‘jack of all trades, master of none’ phrase. I think it’s not as simple as that, it’s more that will do a lot of things to the best of my ability and then I have to decide whether I think that’s an acceptable quality. I’m sort of still finding my feet in all elements of my practice but I really am enjoying myself.

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‘Happy Never Ending’ – D*Face

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On Saturday, September 23, Downtown Los Angeles’ Corey Helford Gallery (CHG) will premiere the long awaited new solo exhibition from world-renowned UK-based multimedia street artist D*Face, entitled “Happy Never Ending.”

As one of the most prolific contemporary urban artists of his generation, D*Face (a.k.a. Dean Stockton) has been at the forefront of his practice since his initial breakthrough in 2005. Working with a variety of mediums and techniques, he uses a family of dysfunctional characters to satirize and hold to ransom all that falls into their grasp – a welcome jolt of subversion in today’s media-saturated environment.

His ambition is to encourage the public eye not just to “see” but to carefully consider the surroundings of our day-to-day, and society’s increasingly bizarre fascination with celebrity culture and mass consumerism.

“For me this work is about the tragedy of losing someone you love. Not just in the physical sense of death but also in the metaphorical way that romance has become such an artificial thing in recent years. Courtship used to be a craft, something careful and considered; marriage was an everlasting bond of trust and commitment. Today though, romance is comparable to a shop bought commodity – instantly attainable at the touch of a button or swipe of a screen. In a constant search for someone or something better, people treat others as if they were mere objects – infinitely attainable and instantly disposable.” – D*Face

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By rethinking, editing and subverting imagery drawn from decades of materialistic consumption – currency, advertising and comic books, D*Face transforms these now iconic motifs, figures and genres in order to gain new insight into today’s conspicuous society. Describing his work as aPOPcalyptic, D*Face seeks to pick up where the masters of 80s American Pop left off – to establish a very real, albeit tongue and cheek criticism of our consumer dominated world.

“With this new series of work I wanted to re-kindle the lost romance of a bygone era, back when, even in death, the memory of a loved one could last an eternity and a marriage went beyond just a symbolic gesture. For the show I want to construct a mini chapel where we can actually hold a real ceremony and a graveyard in which I want people to leave momentos to the people they have lost. If romance is truly dead, then I want to resurrect it for the modern age

The influence I’ve taken from pop-masters like Roy Lichtenstein allows my work to give the clearest possible narrative. At the same time, it offers something more, something beyond the surface of the work – a darker side to pop that resonates with society of today.” D*Face

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The opening reception for “Happy Never Ending” will be hosted Saturday, September 23 from 7-11pm in Gallery 1 at Corey Helford Gallery. The reception is open to the public and on view through October 21. D*Face is recently ordained and in connection with the theme of his show (to resurrect romance in the modern era), he will perform a real marriage ceremony during opening night in front of a chapel installation inside the gallery.

@dface_official

Badgirl Garden

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Stayfly Sydney recently launched a night called Badgirl Garden which showcases female performances along with art installations by designers Ailie Banks & Merindah Funnel.
The stage is owned by rappers, singers and DJs who entertain the crowd, while live art is painted on canvas by artists from the collective.

Badgirl Garden is a space created by a team of women smashing into the Sydney arts and music scene. Every event they create is a safe place for women, men and the LGBTIQ community to congregate, congratulate and party! The goal is to to bring parties and events where everyone can celebrate and support the up and coming female artists of every caliber.

This Thursday Badgirl Garden will be bringing new names to the line up, exciting acts and local artists.

DJ LOU LOU
LADY LASH (Mel)
ALPHAMAMA
JANNAH BETH
JACQUIE MALI

LIVE ART by STYNA & SOPHI ODLING

3 August 2017
9pm start – $5 entry
Slyfox, 199 Enmore Road

@badgirlgarden

‘Self Loathing’ – Mic Porter

True artists are compelled to make art. The reason for their expression is not always important. What is always important, however, is the act of creation. Art comes before reason in the same way that the universe existed before science. Mic Porter is one of those rare, great artists who is simply compelled to create. Mic isn’t driven by ‘career’ nor does he force himself to create consumable art. Mic is, instead, driven by a indefinable, fiery, energy of creation which torments him if he stops. In his youth, this creative compulsion drove Mic towards graffiti. He forged ahead as one of Australia’s pioneer street artists, eventually to be tempered into a painter and sculptor by the VCA and experience at a bronze foundry.

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Mic wrestles his demons with chainsaws, knives, markers and paint upon the battlegrounds of canvas, found objects, bronze and the exterior of tall buildings. His work is primal, expressive and above all, honest. It’s easy to assume that Mic is a conduit for something that he doesn’t understand; that his work is automatic and lacking self awareness. A subconscious process perhaps? After all, Mic’s work is primal, he is reserved and is reluctant to talk about his art. Mic is not a spectator, he has mastered his drive, and is very much in control. Perhaps even due to his reservation to talk about his work, Mic manages to express himself with the kinds of perfectly cryptic sound bytes that other artists drive themselves mad in an attempt to coin. “Art is eternal narcissism, I’m a narcissist” ‘Self Loathing’ brings you a gallery full of screams, smiles and manic grins.

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In Mic’s autobiographical collection of work, he’s produced Totemic heads, brutally sculptured with from blocks of wood with a chainsaw sit in the centre of the large room, loomed over by the three largest Self Loathing paintings. The triptych feature Mic Porters iconic faces, instantly recognisable for the role that they’ve played in shaping Australia’s street art landscape for over a decade, now rendered in a mix of oil and enamel. Each face is Mic’s, but also his family and society’s, he explains that it’s history coming through his face. I think that it’s more than that, I think Mic is so brutally honest with himself, that the self portraits end up reflecting all of us, which is why they’re so alluring and powerful.

– Alex Mitchell

‘Self Loathing’ will be on display at Backwoods Gallery from the 4th until the 20th of August. The collection will consisted of paintings, bronze and wood sculptures and installations across two rooms and Backwoods Lane.

VHILS – FESTIVAL IMINENTE – LONDON

FESTIVAL IMINENTE NEW ART AND NEW MUSIC FROM EUROPE’S UNDERGROUND OLD TRUMAN BREWERY, LONDON FRIDAY 28 & SATURDAY 29 JULY, 2017

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This Summer, a European cultural invasion hits the heart of Brexit Britain as the very first UK edition of Festival Iminente opens at London’s Old Truman Brewery. A two‐day festival of explosive and experimental Portuguese art and music, Festival Iminente brings the soul of Lisbon to the heart of London, following its successful debut in the Oeiras region of Lisbon in September 2016.

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Curated by Portuguese artist Vhils and Lisbon’s Underdogs Gallery, Festival Iminente not only offers Brits mourning Brexit a chance to immerse themselves in the most innovative new music and art from Portugal but also enlists some of Europe’s most creatively exciting artists to invade the capital with their best work.

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RONE – THE OMEGA PROJECT

In yet another covert project set in a doomed, abandoned space, acclaimed Melbourne-based street artist Rone announces his latest work, The Omega Project – a nostalgic and haunting homage to the fading remnants of mid-century Australiana.

On the back of his hugely successful 2016 solo exhibition, Empty and a recent turn producing a large-scale mural for rural Victoria’s Silo Art Project, the internationally renowned Melbourne street artist has turned his attention back to his hometown for another fleetingly brief exhibition – this time set in a condemned suburban home. Check out this incredible VR-ready 3D tour of the site from the guys at Phoria:

www.captur3d.io/view/scann3d/rone-secret-location

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JonOne’s “The Fall” print release

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Legendary American graffiti artist JonOne aka Jon156, just released his latest limited edition print through PrintThemAll.com. NY-born and Harlem raised artist currently living in Paris, produced this lithograph in Idem Studio, using their infamous Marinoni Machines press.

The artist who was born as John Andrew Perello in ’63, spent his early days tagging his name around Harlem and making ground work for what is now known the world of graffiti and street art. Since his first solo show in 1990 in Berlin, the founder of 156 All Starz Crew had a chance to present his art all over the globe. Appreciative of this journey and the opportunities given, this particular work is sort of a “homage to challenges of life and the process of growing”. Representing the colorful flowers growing from the ashes in the concrete ghettos of New York city, “The Fall” symbolizes the rise and evolution of his work. The lithograph is produced on a hand cut 270g BFK Rives paper measuring 70 cm x 83 cm (27,56 x 32,68 inches), and each of the 199 signed, numbered and stamped pieces was produced using 27 colors.

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PrintThemAll.com
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‘Surface Tension’ – Silk Roy

Celebrating over a decade of creativity, Melbourne artist Silk Roy brings his debut solo show ‘Surface Tension’ to Melbourne. In the lead up to the show (opening this Friday), Silky was kind enough to chat with us.

How and when did you get into art and why?

I always enjoyed drawing when I was a kid, but it wasn’t ever something I thought I’d pursue until I moved to Melbourne in ’98. I’d never seen graffiti before having come over from Singapore, which in comparison was/still is a spotless city. I’d take the train to school and back everyday and it was hard not to notice the smashed insides and the walls on the line changing nightly. For a 13 year old, the idea of having an alias that people identified you by and going out on missions was pretty appealing. It wasn’t until years later that I’d realize this daydream, but of course now being an active writer, artist, creative is much more that, it’s given me a sense of ‘self’, and outlet to express my ideas and thoughts and a platform to continue my creative journey.

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You run two identities, Kid Silk and Silk Roy, How did this come about?

Basically I arrived at a point where I needed to let my graffiti and studio practise have their own shine as trying to put all my work under one name was confusing and felt forced. Silk is an old nickname I was given a long time ago so it was a no-brainer as far as putting it up as a writer.

‘Kid Silk’ came about because of my insta handle, other writers would meet me and ask who I was, I’d reply ‘Silk’ and they’d ask ‘Like Kid Silk?” It also works in terms of me keeping graffiti for myself, I don’t intend to profit from it or ever make it feel like work, it’s fun and I get to go out and essentially be a kid.

Silk Roy on the other hand is the name I work under when I’m showing / producing studio work. Two identities works for me now as I’ve started getting opportunities for both which is cool as far as keeping things varied creatively.

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