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‘Lateralisation’ – Liam Snootle

L A T E R AL I S AT I OИ
noun
[lat-er-uh-luh-zey-shuhn]
The functional specialisation of the brain with some skills, such as analytical and mathematical occurring primarily in the left hemisphere and others, such as perception of visual and spatial relationships occurring primarily on the right.

Liam Snootle presents new paintings that encourage an internal dialogue by stimulating the viewer’s lateralisation.

VNA: It’s been 12 months since we last spoke, what has been happening in your world?
LS: Yes, well if I’d said it’d gone quickly I’d be lying. At the time of my last show we were blessed with the very early arrival of our first child, little George. He had a pretty hectic first few months, I think it was 137 days in the hospital but now he is home and doing amazingly well, such a happy and inspiring person.

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Photo: Nik Epifanidis

VNA: How has the birth of your son changed the way you look at things? Has it changed your artistic practice at all?
LS: I’d have to say it has completely changed me, priorities have been totally reworked. I struggled to find time to paint but I’m in such a great space at the moment, after a really tough time and I’d like to think this newfound optimism and inspiration is reflected in my latest body of work which has come together nicely.

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Photo: Nik Epifanidis

VNA: Tell us a little about ‘Lateralisation’. There is often a lot in the name of a show, why did you go down the ‘Lateralisation’ path?
LS: Lateralisation is the theory that people have a tendency to use different hemispheres of their brains in different ways, a preference of one over the other, mathematical/analytical on one and creativity on the other. I’ve always felt I did both of these naturally and these paintings are my attempt a creating an environment where the viewer was forced to get both hemispheres working in unison.

VNA: What is the make up of the show? Is there a piece you are particularly proud of?
LS: Most of the paintings are diptychs of colour blocks with a black and white dynamic geometric expression. I’m hoping that the two halves complement one another. I’m fond of all of them but there is a personal favourite that I’m hoping stays unsold (they probably all will).

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Photo: Nik Epifanidis

VNA: What do you hope people will take away from the show? What messages (if any) are you trying to convey to your viewers?
LS: I’m hoping that people that usually walk away from contemporary art saying “I don’t get it” might have an awakening.

VNA: If you could collaborate with anyone, who would you choose and why?
LS: I’ve got a soundtrack that plays during the show which was designed and recorded by my brother, Dylan. He’s an amazing singer, songwriter and guitarist and I guess this was our first art/music collaboration. It’s something I’d love to build upon for future projects.

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Photo: Nik Epifanidis

VNA: When we last spoke, you commented on the generational gap between you and your students ever increasing and your goal is to make art full time. How is that journey coming along?
LS: Oh yeah that gap is getting wider and wider, they’ve just made me realise that cool music is now called Dad Rock and that my preference for double denim is downright embarrassing. As far as full time art is concerned, well I still have a mortgage and the bank insists that I keep going back to the classroom most days!

@liamsnootle

‘Lateralisation’ opens this Friday at ‘Off the Kerb Gallery’ 66B Johnston St, Collingwood.

‘Happy Never Ending’ – D*Face

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On Saturday, September 23, Downtown Los Angeles’ Corey Helford Gallery (CHG) will premiere the long awaited new solo exhibition from world-renowned UK-based multimedia street artist D*Face, entitled “Happy Never Ending.”

As one of the most prolific contemporary urban artists of his generation, D*Face (a.k.a. Dean Stockton) has been at the forefront of his practice since his initial breakthrough in 2005. Working with a variety of mediums and techniques, he uses a family of dysfunctional characters to satirize and hold to ransom all that falls into their grasp – a welcome jolt of subversion in today’s media-saturated environment.

His ambition is to encourage the public eye not just to “see” but to carefully consider the surroundings of our day-to-day, and society’s increasingly bizarre fascination with celebrity culture and mass consumerism.

“For me this work is about the tragedy of losing someone you love. Not just in the physical sense of death but also in the metaphorical way that romance has become such an artificial thing in recent years. Courtship used to be a craft, something careful and considered; marriage was an everlasting bond of trust and commitment. Today though, romance is comparable to a shop bought commodity – instantly attainable at the touch of a button or swipe of a screen. In a constant search for someone or something better, people treat others as if they were mere objects – infinitely attainable and instantly disposable.” – D*Face

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By rethinking, editing and subverting imagery drawn from decades of materialistic consumption – currency, advertising and comic books, D*Face transforms these now iconic motifs, figures and genres in order to gain new insight into today’s conspicuous society. Describing his work as aPOPcalyptic, D*Face seeks to pick up where the masters of 80s American Pop left off – to establish a very real, albeit tongue and cheek criticism of our consumer dominated world.

“With this new series of work I wanted to re-kindle the lost romance of a bygone era, back when, even in death, the memory of a loved one could last an eternity and a marriage went beyond just a symbolic gesture. For the show I want to construct a mini chapel where we can actually hold a real ceremony and a graveyard in which I want people to leave momentos to the people they have lost. If romance is truly dead, then I want to resurrect it for the modern age

The influence I’ve taken from pop-masters like Roy Lichtenstein allows my work to give the clearest possible narrative. At the same time, it offers something more, something beyond the surface of the work – a darker side to pop that resonates with society of today.” D*Face

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The opening reception for “Happy Never Ending” will be hosted Saturday, September 23 from 7-11pm in Gallery 1 at Corey Helford Gallery. The reception is open to the public and on view through October 21. D*Face is recently ordained and in connection with the theme of his show (to resurrect romance in the modern era), he will perform a real marriage ceremony during opening night in front of a chapel installation inside the gallery.

@dface_official

MIRROR STAGE by KIM HYUNJI

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Kim Hyunji has created a collection of portraits that uncover each of her models carefully curated social media personas to find true beauty in the discarded remains, deemed unfit for projection. The collection, titled Mirror Stage, is an honest counter point to the rise of the online persona that bravely evokes feelings of love, alienation, angst, and hope.

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Kim Hyunji, aka KIM KIM KIM, is a painter from South Korea, currently based in Melbourne, Australia. Recognising Australia’s multiculturalism and diversity, Hyunji’s main subjects are the culturally attuned creatives of her generation, the Millennials. In real life and social media, she often observes the impacts of a globalised society – its conveniences, and pitfalls. Her unique style of portraiture is intended to portray the issues this generation is facing.

Opens Friday, Sept 15th and is on display until Sunday, Oct 1st – Backwoods Gallery.

@kimkimkimxx

Ronzo print release: Hugs for Grenfell

Vandal extraordinaire and VNA featured artist Ronzo and ArtAppeal are releasing a print ‘ Hugs for Grenfell’ to  raise money for Grenfell Families. After more than 10 weeks, the majority of the survivors are still in need of our help. Buying this print is a very quick and effective way to aid those affected. All profits from the sales will go to the Grenfell families via local organisation ‘Love4Grenfell‘ who will pass them on directly, to avoid the long delays and high administration costs of big charities. This is a great opportunity to combine your love of art with donating money for a good cause.

Ronzo Hugsfor Grenfell

 

Charity Screen Print Release in Support of Grenfell Families.

2 colour hand pulled screen print, Dimensions: 50cm x 50cm, Edition: 100 Signed and numbered by the artist. Price: £25 (+ £4 UK postage)

buy and donate

 

Big up & thank you for your support!

For more info visit ArtAppeal

‘Equilibrium’ – SENEKT

Harmony rings within the chaos of society. As life’s ups and downs cancel each other out, a sense of balance can be found. Wrestling with positive and negative forces, Senekt’s solo exhibition explores the impacts and outcomes of life’s fluctuating experiences. With artworks fuelled by emotion, Senekt’s surreal style is highlighted by the mood, colour, and balance of each piece.

Senekt portrays the dissemblance of his own reality through hyper-realistic drawings flooded with colour and surreal dimensions. The Japanese painter from Kyoto has been based out of Melbourne, Australia since 2013. Inspired by friendships, photographs, disjointed memories, everyday experiences, and daily occurrences, Senekt found balance through creation. His figurative, yet abstract style confront the nature of instinct as Senekt aims to not only deconstruct the human physicality, but also its psyche.

On display at Backwoods Gallery from August 25th-27th, the artwork, created in coloured pencil, aerosol and watercolour spans throughout three rooms. Fuelled by love/hate, good/evil, and ever-present mindfulness, Senekts’ large suspended installation portrays his unique perspective on equilibrium in society.

Request an exhibition catalogue from: sales@backwoods.gallery

Badgirl Garden

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Stayfly Sydney recently launched a night called Badgirl Garden which showcases female performances along with art installations by designers Ailie Banks & Merindah Funnel.
The stage is owned by rappers, singers and DJs who entertain the crowd, while live art is painted on canvas by artists from the collective.

Badgirl Garden is a space created by a team of women smashing into the Sydney arts and music scene. Every event they create is a safe place for women, men and the LGBTIQ community to congregate, congratulate and party! The goal is to to bring parties and events where everyone can celebrate and support the up and coming female artists of every caliber.

This Thursday Badgirl Garden will be bringing new names to the line up, exciting acts and local artists.

DJ LOU LOU
LADY LASH (Mel)
ALPHAMAMA
JANNAH BETH
JACQUIE MALI

LIVE ART by STYNA & SOPHI ODLING

3 August 2017
9pm start – $5 entry
Slyfox, 199 Enmore Road

@badgirlgarden

‘Self Loathing’ – Mic Porter

True artists are compelled to make art. The reason for their expression is not always important. What is always important, however, is the act of creation. Art comes before reason in the same way that the universe existed before science. Mic Porter is one of those rare, great artists who is simply compelled to create. Mic isn’t driven by ‘career’ nor does he force himself to create consumable art. Mic is, instead, driven by a indefinable, fiery, energy of creation which torments him if he stops. In his youth, this creative compulsion drove Mic towards graffiti. He forged ahead as one of Australia’s pioneer street artists, eventually to be tempered into a painter and sculptor by the VCA and experience at a bronze foundry.

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Mic wrestles his demons with chainsaws, knives, markers and paint upon the battlegrounds of canvas, found objects, bronze and the exterior of tall buildings. His work is primal, expressive and above all, honest. It’s easy to assume that Mic is a conduit for something that he doesn’t understand; that his work is automatic and lacking self awareness. A subconscious process perhaps? After all, Mic’s work is primal, he is reserved and is reluctant to talk about his art. Mic is not a spectator, he has mastered his drive, and is very much in control. Perhaps even due to his reservation to talk about his work, Mic manages to express himself with the kinds of perfectly cryptic sound bytes that other artists drive themselves mad in an attempt to coin. “Art is eternal narcissism, I’m a narcissist” ‘Self Loathing’ brings you a gallery full of screams, smiles and manic grins.

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In Mic’s autobiographical collection of work, he’s produced Totemic heads, brutally sculptured with from blocks of wood with a chainsaw sit in the centre of the large room, loomed over by the three largest Self Loathing paintings. The triptych feature Mic Porters iconic faces, instantly recognisable for the role that they’ve played in shaping Australia’s street art landscape for over a decade, now rendered in a mix of oil and enamel. Each face is Mic’s, but also his family and society’s, he explains that it’s history coming through his face. I think that it’s more than that, I think Mic is so brutally honest with himself, that the self portraits end up reflecting all of us, which is why they’re so alluring and powerful.

– Alex Mitchell

‘Self Loathing’ will be on display at Backwoods Gallery from the 4th until the 20th of August. The collection will consisted of paintings, bronze and wood sculptures and installations across two rooms and Backwoods Lane.