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‘The Mountains We Climb’ – Ed Bechervaise

Urban contemporary artist Unwell Bunny (also known as Ed Bechervaise) opens his new exhibition ‘The Mountains We Climb’ on September 28th 2018, at Marfa Gallery in Melbourne.

‘The Mountains We Climb’ is a new body of work in which Ed explores Japan and its sensibilities. It has layers of feelings, from the chaos of Tokyo to the stillness of Kanazawa Hills. Each image is broken down into fragments, with slabs of colour, texture and tone that symbolise the experience, whether by night or day, dusk or dawn. This is a time capsule of travel, but also of the struggle and exploration each of us go through in growing as people and evolving beyond what we know.

‘The Mountains We Climb’ is about pushing the limits of understanding. Exploring that place that brings discomfort and pushing the elements of your processing ability. Ed has done this with his exploration of abstraction and reinterpretation, pushing forward a more sophisticated pallet. Deconstructing the elements he has recorded and reshaped through memory and feeling of Japan. Finding new cords with colour and with textual mediums that join together to form landscapes. With its global sensibility and edgy urban undertones, Ed’s motivations are both to be pleasing aesthetically while also disruptive emotionally, triggering questions in the viewer, which is both inward and outwardly focused.

Discover more at www.unwellbunny.com or Marfa Gallery http://www.marfagallery.com/exhibtion/

D*FACE: ‘HOME IS WHERE THE heART IS’

Internationally celebrated street artist D*FACE has been at the forefront of his practice since his initial breakthrough in 2005. Having grown up amidst the streets of London, he cultivated a keen interest in graffiti art and its disaffected mindset from an early age. As a teenager his artistic attentions turned to skate culture and the iconic skate deck designs of Jim Phillips and Vernon Courtlandt Johnson that he found in Thrasher Magazine. Inspired by their punk DIY aesthetic, D*Face attended an illustration and design course before beginning work as a freelance artist. Taking the public domain of the street as his canvas, he blended art, design and graffiti in a manner that pre-dated the emergence of street art as it is known today. Here the artist gained a great deal of attention, quickly rising to fame for the vivid nature of his designs. Despite now working in the gallery as well as the open canvas of the streets, D*Face continues to approach his work with the same anarchic energy that drove him to begin his career from the outset. His vibrant pop style and D*Dog logo have become synonymous with British street style and are recognized the world-over.

In addition to collaborating with the likes of Shepard Fairy and Banksy, D*Face has collaborated with Her Royal Highness Queen Elizabeth II on a project that involved the customization of banknotes and coins and their secret reinsertion back into public circulation. In 2005 the artist was also commissioned by the Vatican to produce a portrait in commemoration of Pope Benedict XVI’s instatement.

“HOME IS WHERE THE heART IS” is D*Face’s first ever exhibition in the Pacific Northwest. The exhibition will highlight some of his most iconic works to date including his depictions of recognizable females in the likes of Marilyn Monroe and Queen Elizabeth II.

The majority of D*Face’s work is centered around the heart throbbing, push-pull affections of love and loss, most notably visible in his series of painted romance novel book covers. Using the name of the book as context, the paintings compliment the artist’s inter- pretation of the titles. Other notable works in the exhibition will include his iconic use of Coca Cola bottles and the repetitious use of the word “RIOT.” The word is a reference to the anti-authoritarian roots of street art culture and represents the self-described “poor man’s grenade,” an object associated with dissent. The RIOT series explores the use the objects as means to instill change through protest and revolution.

“I want to encourage people to not just to see, but to look at what surrounds them and their lives, re- ecting our increasingly bizarre popular culture, re-thinking and reworking cultural gures and genres to comment on our ethos of conspicuous consumption.”D*FACE

Opening reception on Thursday, August 2nd from 6pm-9pm at TREASON Gallery located in Pioneer Square, 319 3RD AVE S, Seattle, WA 98104.

More info available: WWW.TREASONGALLERY.COM

‘Utopia’ – Adam Kinninmont

Since their beginnings, our friends at Backwoods have always fostered local and young artists. As they move into the future, Backwoods Forewoods aims to stay true to this ethos, fostering relationships with the next generation of up and coming Australian artists. Through this program, Backwoods Forewoods will spotlight young and local talent through a series of weekend exhibitions designed to support and promote our favourite emerging artists.

Backwoods are pleased to launch the program with their long time friend of the gallery, Adam Kinninmont, and his collection titled ‘Utopia.’

Adam Kinninmont, formerly known as Swerfk, is a Melbourne-based graphic artist. In his earliest memory of drawing, he is a four year old, pausing a Disney cartoon in order to trace over the character on the screen. This childhood exposure to TV animation and comic books, and later the skate and graffiti scene of his youth, has all played a role in the development of his artistic vision and unique graphic style. Since completing a Bachelor of Visual Arts in Printmaking and Drawing at the ANU in Canberra, Kinninmont has exhibited throughout Australia and internationally. His focus has recently shifted from graffiti to fine art graphic work. ‘Utopia’ is his first exhibition under his real name.

Kinninmont’s latest series claims its title somewhat ironically. In this body of work, the Western mirage of a sublime suburban existence is dissolved, and seen to be degraded, used, worn down over time by the grind and grit of everyday life. These street moments are composed from his own observation and exploration of Melbourne suburbia, in particular the older industrial suburbs of Collingwood and Brunswick. They are inspired by his interest in art deco and European style architecture, and of the tradition of architectural design illustration, which provides the backdrop for the ephemeral graffiti conversation irrepressibly expressed onto the scene. With inspiration drawn from the late Howard Arkley’s bright, highly stylised Melbourne suburbia paintings, Kinninmont’s illustrations have an added element of unease and mischievousness, a nod to the lively street culture here. Characterised by a bold 80s colour palette, his energetic, gestural style is balanced with technically executed detail and stylised abstraction. The presence of people is noticeably missing from each scene, leaving the natural and designed elements to be admired. However, this is no House & Garden magazine dream: you can see the cracks. – Helani Laisk

@akinninmont

@backwoods.gallery

‘A Forgiving Sunset’ – Scott Albrecht

First Amendment Gallery is proud to present ‘A Forgiving Sunset’, a solo exhibition of new woodworks, works on paper and steel sculptures by Scott Albrecht.

‘A Forgiving Sunset’ exhibits Albrecht’s most recent body of work offering an evolved approach to his unique graphic languages. Largely rooted in typography, his work reconsiders the relationship of message and viewer. With each work being made up of dozens, sometimes several hundreds of individual pieces that are cut, sanded, painted and re-assembled, often at varied depths, the works shift the conversation to a more visual language of relationships starting with form and color.



The narratives of Scott’s work often pull from or reference his own experiences and distill them into a more universal interpretation to allow the viewer to relate their own experiences, and in turn showing how we are more connected by these shared events.

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PHANTOM PAIN by YUSK IMAI and DANTE HOROIWA


“During one of our many discussions in the studio, we came across a hidden sensation, something that is always present, yet its causes or even the meaning of its existence still felt very abstract, but we agreed in describing it as a dull but constant pain.

This is our attempt to interpret this well of abstract sensations, and during this process we hit many notes, but one in particular kept showing up over and over for both of us, death. Maybe the fear of it, maybe what it leaves behind for the living, whatever it is, it exists.

This phantom pain keeps us going, fuelling our actions in life, always present, like gravity flowing through us and all things, always wise, reminding us, ironically, that everything is impermanent.

We hope that you may welcome this pain with warmth, and that it may feel less abstract now, as it does for us, through our exhibition Phantom Pain at Backwoods Gallery from June 8th to June 24th 2018.”

– Yusk Imai and Dante Horoiwa

YUSK IMAI

Yusk Imai is a contemporary artist who was born in the U.S.A. in 1982, to a Japanese descendent family. At the age of 6 months his family migrated to São Paulo where he currently lives and works.

Since 2007, Yusk has exhibited extensively within galleries, at art fairs and on the street across Europe, U.S.A., Australia and South America. The flat perspectives and dramatic curves demonstrated in Imai’s work is reminiscent of Art Nouveau greats such as Gustav Klimt.

Imai’s paintings and drawings lure us into state of self-consciousness and questioning. These ostensibly post-apocalyptic works tread warily between sci-fi apparitions, threatening premonitions and horror stills. Like a séance, they speak to Dali’s technique for creative thinking; a thinking that was founded on the moments in which we begin to fall asleep. When this sleeping pattern is interrupted and we are awoken, we find the subconscious rise to the conscious as a definitive form.

DANTE HOROIWA

Dante Horoiwa is a self-taught contemporary artist who was born in São Paulo, Brazil in 1988, to a Japanese descendent family. Recently, Horoiwa has exhibited his paintings at the El Centenario Museum in Mexico, with further features in United States, South and North American galleries, as well as large scale murals on the streets of East and West Europe.

His work frequently deals with themes closely connected to the foundations of human existence, which are universal to all living beings. Using a placid colour scheme of neutral shades, Horoiwa’s paintings, drawings and murals possess a mysterious, spiritual and soulful tonality. His work delves into the depths of human experience to explore the seen and unseen, using familiar devices such as long hair, textiles, plants and threads to connect the various forms, and evoke our sense of something magical and supernatural.

Exhibition catalogue available on request from: sales@backwoods.gallery

@imaiyusk
@dantehoroiwa
@backwoods.gallery

‘Lonesome Souls’ – Loretta Lizzio

“Occasionally one wakes at 4 am. With the urge to drive south in the dark and feel the dawn peek back. To stop at the deserted beach and swim into the chill of anonymity with no obligation to anyone or anything, salved in a loss.”
Brett Whitely

With a style that’s developed from pen and line drawings, through realistic pencil drawings and blossomed into painting, ‘Lonesome Souls’ explores people. People who soothe themselves by being alone and enjoying solitude in natural places enticing the viewer to feel still and a little more tranquil.

After developing an obsession with water, Lizzio was captured by the underwater photography of Janaka Rodrigue, something which she knew she had to paint. This body of work forms the main theme of ‘Lonesome Souls’, exploring the feeling of weightlessness, the feeling being completely immersed in nothingness. ‘Lonesome Souls’ is the culmination of months of hard work, non-stop creating and no social life, but Lizzio states, “It’s the most natural thing to me, the best release andsomething that makes me happier than anything else.”

‘Lonesome Souls’ opens this Friday 27 May 2018, at 226A Johnston St, Fitzroy.
@loretta_lizzio

‘Scarlet’ – James Reka

‘Du bist verrückt mein Kind, du mußt nach Berlin.’ (Franz von Suppé)

Have you ever felt that things are not within your power? Meekness is a fiendish strategy to hold intact all that is dreadful and extreme. Self-subversion and asceticism hold strong, but quietly and softly the eyes of the charming and innocent boggle upwards at the hedonist. She unveils the dark ritual of work, eat, sleep, repeat – the catalepsy caused by first world existence; escalating the desire for pleasure to it’s all mighty destruction. She is Scarlet.

From the roaring 1920’s, to the second World War, and the Berlin Wall that divided the German Capital for 28 years – Berlin has historically been a dark dystopia, juxtaposed between desire and destruction. The fate this city bore has given birth to unique cultural grounds, where the lines between high life and underground are inescapably blurry. Nourished by street art, punk culture, techno music, sexual laxity and hedonism – a new generation has transformed the artefacts of Berlin’s dark past to create a Scarlet utopia of the post-war state.

Following a journey of influence in Berlin, Reka returns to Melbourne for his first solo exhibition in 4 years – Scarlet. Metaphoric notions of reconstruction are actualised through the post-cubist, industrial stylisation of the female form that features throughout Reka’s latest works – both painted and sculptural. His ‘Scarlet’ collection bears Reka’s iconic visual language, with hints of a modern romance amidst historical sculptural artefacts, erotic art forms and Berlin’s unavoidable pleasures.

Surrender to the hedonist, wander the darkness and experience James Reka’s ‘Scarlet’ at Backwoods Gallery from March 23rd to April 8th 2018. Enquiries: sales@backwoods.gallery

James Reka stands as one of Australia’s most respected young contemporary artists, having earn’t his place in the National Gallery of Australia’s permanent collection. While currently based in Berlin, Germany. His origins lie in the alleyways and train lines of Melbourne’s inner-suburbs, where he spent over a decade refining his now-emblematic aesthetic and pioneering of a new style of street art in Australia as part of the original Everfresh crew.

Surrealist, abstracted characters emerge from the depths of Reka’s mind, communicating through strong lines, bold colours and post-cubist styling. These figures live in the homes and laneways of three continents, clambering up walls and enriching the urban environment with his iconic visual language.

With influences in pop culture, cartooning and illustration, Reka’s studio style emerged from his early design practice, featuring striking lines and colour ways. Over time, the logos and symbols he created evolved into more structured, animated forms and evolved to new mediums: murals, photography, and most recently sculpture.

Through these origins, Reka has developed an incredibly diligent, almost obsessive attention to the technical proficiency of his studio work, which has elevated him to produce meticulously detailed, collected pieces. His art sits somewhere between humorous and menacing, contrasting the two opposing feelings in a way that is unique to his vision. These pseudo-human forms are recognisable but isolating, playful yet eerie.

This is Reka’s art: a paradox between fastidious design and graffiti.

Recently, Reka has held solo shows in London, San Francisco, Paris and Milan, has exhibited at the Royal West of England Academy (RWA) in Bristol, as well as pieces appearing in New York, Munich, Denver and Cologne exhibitions. On the streets, his characters adorn the walls of cities around the world from Japan to Buenos Aires, Montreal to Brooklyn, Rome and Berlin.

@rekaone

Herakut’s RENTAL ASYLUM

On Saturday, February 24, downtown Los Angeles’ Corey Helford Gallery (CHG) will proudly present the latest exhibition from leading German graffiti artists and storytellers HERAKUT — HERA (Jasmin Siddiqui) and AKUT (Falk Lehmann). Titled “Herakut’s RENTAL ASYLUM,” the exhibition of all new works will inhabit CHG’s 4,500 square-foot main gallery, with the artists in attendance.

Regarding their newest creations, HERAKUT states: “The show is called ‘Rental Asylum’ — as we all need to rent a place somewhere far from today’s actual reality, don’t we? And all our creatures on canvas are the happy patients of our rental asylum. They all have different reasons for checking in with us, for a bit, before facing the shit show our world has become.”

After joining forces in 2004, the artists merged their names and styles to collaborate as HERAKUT. Since then, the duo have been painting murals all over the world, along with additional works on canvas, paper and film for gallery and museum shows. Beyond international exhibitions around the world (France, Gaza, Germany and Jordan, among many others), live festival showings at Glastonbury (U.K.), Coachella (U.S.) and an appearance at the Happy 80th Birthday, Dalai Lama celebration (U.S.), this marks HERAKUT’s second exhibition at the gallery.

HERAKUT consider themselves “storytellers” who want to share their thoughts and questions with the public, so their figurative work is always accompanied with text. Their process of painting is also a dialogue with both artists adding their individual techniques to the piece. Jasmin uses her drawing skills on finding the form and proportion of their characters, while Falk specializes on painting the photorealistic elements.

In addition, HERAKUT are also involved with a variety of charity organizations — where the two work with children in schools and youth programs teaching young people to create a world for themselves — inside their minds. A collection of their work can be found in their books HERAKUT – the perfect merge and After The Laughter.

@herakut

BAILER – ‘DUALITY’

‘Duality’, an exhibition from Melbourne artist, Bailer, opens at fortyfivedownstairs, Melbourne, on Tuesday 30 January 2018.

Photo: p1xels

Featuring paintings and sculptural works that traverse liminal states of being, ‘Duality’ aims to explore the ever-changing state of the human condition. Through abstraction, the viewer is immersed, unlocking their own mutable states of mind and coming to understand that nothing ever stays the same. All is fluid, moving.

Capturing a likeness of something that already occupies space has never really interested Bailer. Instead, the development of a personal style and the refinement of an enjoyable cathartic process takes precedence. Process is the most important part of Bailer’s artistic expression, and is clearly apparent in his work.

‘I have used art (and an array of other activities) as a form of escapism for many years. Graffiti, muralism, sketching, writing, all forms of creativity I have used to escape the hands of time, the act of contemplating my own successes/failures, impending mortality, the inequities of an unjust society. Getting deeply lost in the creative process is like ducking my head below the breakers. The roar of the ocean instantly forgotten in the calm below, surfacing for air briefly only to dive deeper. The noise of self- doubt, expectation and pressure fading into the depths.’ – Bailer

Photo: p1xels

Painting publicly in Melbourne for 20 years, Bailer’s style is instantly recognisable. The roots of his work are imbedded deeply in the graffiti subculture, and his new pieces push outside the self-imposed boundaries of genre. Bailer’s studio practice and public art incorporate a broad range of artistic modes.

Bailer’s art practice is varied: from large scale creations across walls in Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Bali and Europe to more intimate approaches on canvas evoking existential explorations of the mind. His work is a fusion of biomech – surrealist manifestations of the self – expressed within abstract forms. Bailer’s art is currently positioned within these liminal states of the mind.

‘Duality’ opens at fortyfivedownstairs 45 Flinders Lane Melbourne on Tuesday 30 January from 5pm.

For catalogue enquires, contact curator: georgia.rouette@gmail.com

Gallery Hours: Tuesday to Friday 11am-5pm, Saturday 12pm-4pm

@_bailer

Q&A with LING

Born in New Zealand and raised on Melbourne’s Hurstbridge line, Ling is a multi-faceted artist based in Melbourne’s infamous Everfresh Studio. With a background in stylised lettering and graffiti, Ling is also well known for his 80’s and 90’s pop culture pieces, littering the streets of Melbourne and beyond, pushing those who come in contact with the pieces to reminisce of days gone by.

Having shot to international notoriety through his “Allure of Gold” project, taking everyday items like trains and cars that have been left to degrade and painting them gold, giving them the illusion of value once again, Ling is now pushing things even harder. Whilst on the hunt for a holy grail gold piece – ‘I noticed an abandoned fighter jet at Santorini airport…’– Ling has started working on far more diverse projects, pushing the canvas-based boundaries of portraiture and abstract work. A member of Melbourne’s ID crew, Ling is no stranger to collaboration, and is as familiar working alone as he is taking part in full scale productions, including most recently at Denmark’s Roskilde festival.


Photo: LING

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