Show Recap: Prefab77

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A couple of weeks’ ago, the Prefab77 crew hit London with their first solo show in the big smoke. The show at Hoxton Gallery, presented by Breaks, drew a large crowd on a nice warm evening to view an pretty eclectic collection of works that spanned painting, screen printing, engraving and metal work.

It was brave move to not simply show their more ‘signature’ style (which I immediately associate with monochromatic, larger pieces in the street) but by and large it worked, particularly some of the pieces on wood. The signature style was still in evidence and any work that manges to reference AC/DC songs is always a good thing.

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‘A Feature Presentation’ – Hanna Newman and Joshua Smith

Curse of the Coven

The USA based Unearthed film production studios were a horror film studio at large in the 1970s. Rivaling the Amicus and Hammer Horror film studios, the company, formed by Hanna Newman and Joshua Smith was big hit in Grind-house theatres until an explosion occurred on the set of the unreleased film ‘The Sisters of Satan’ in 1979 engulfing the entire film studios in fire.

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‘Post-Graffiti Pacific’ – Benjamin Work

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Part three in our ongoing ‘Post-Graffiti Pacific’ roles out today, with a comprehensive chat with artist Benjamin Work. Benjamin is of mixed Scottish and Tongan ancestry, and intially struggled to find a sense of belonging and gravitated towards the pop-cultural influences emanating from Los Angeles in the 1990s, such as skate, fashion, gang and graffiti culture. Today, Benjamin’s journey to learn more about his Tongan ancestry has led him to discover images of antique Tongan weapons finely carved with often overlooked symbols of warriors and royalty. These key figures in motion, form the majority of Benjamin’s works with strength and power and occasionally, the Lupe, a pacific bird of peace, feature in his works. He continues to explore the power of kula (red) and uli (black) and their connections to titles, Christian beliefs and youth gangs in Tongan thinking and practice.

Damo: What does it mean to you to be part of ‘Post-Graffiti Pacific’?
Benjamin: It’s a statement from a group of creatives that marks a place in time (tā) and space (vā). We are situated in a unique and rich part of the globe that has been subject to many misconceptions throughout the ages, so we are one part of that voice telling our stories from this region of the world. Just like our forefathers who were explorers venturing into uncharted waters, also with us, as we explore what it looks like to be Post graffiti in the Pacific Region.

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Mr Bingo’s retrospective Hate Mail: The Definitive Collection

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Mr Bingo entered the final week of his fundraising campaign for Hate Mail: The Definitive Collection. The book is planned to be the ultimate retrospective of Mr Bingo’s popular Hate Mail project that started back in 2011.

Since the beginning of the project Mr Bingo has sent 928 vintage postcards skillfully emblazoned with offensive messages to (mostly) willing recipients. The book will be showcasing 156 artist’s favorite postcards created over the years on some 300 litho print pages. The book will be printed and bound to the highest standards by a renowned art book printer in Italy. Clothbound, foil stamped and comprised of the finest German book paper, the production and design of the book will be handled by Darren Wall, a London-based art director and publisher with over a decade of experience in design for print.

Although the artist already reached the first and second campaign goal, it’s still possible to support this project and win one of the rewards that range from copies of the book itself, receiving a personal hate mail on the internet, in a book or on a postcard, to getting drunk on a train with the artist himself.

Mr-Bingo.org.uk

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‘Post-Graffiti Pacific’ – Route52

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Next up in our ‘Post-Graffiti Pacific’ series is Route52. Route52 (Brendan Kitto) expanded from the activities of skating and graffiti to the documentation of what he perceived as important youth culture. With age, this concept was further refined. His need to document process and happenings, capturing a time and place, became his point of difference in graffiti documentation, since most people at the time would only photograph the final result. This patience to capture THE shot in urban popular culture and fashion, has enabled him to exhibit his photos in both group and solo shows. With respect to the past and moving forward with the future, Route52 embraces medium format, 35mm and digital photography, with his own in-house black and white development dark room.

Damo: What does it mean to you to be part of Post-Graffiti Pacific?
Route52: Being able to take the next step into the art arena with friends I have been doing graffiti with over the past 10 – 15 years.

Damo: Can you talk us through your piece, and how you responded to the brief from conception to finalisation?
Route52: There was no brief really, apart from bring your best. I concentrated on a body of work that that I have been working on over the last 4 – 5 years, which is the protests that have been happening regularly over that time.

I chose to work with images from the deep sea oil drill protests and visited parts of New Zealand’s West Coast to shoot images of the landscape that would be affected if a oil spill was to happen.

Damo: How does your piece reflect the ‘dawn of a new movement in art’?
Route52: I wouldn’t say my piece is the dawn of a new art movement, I would like it to make people think of the larger issues rather than their favourite contestant getting voted off a reality TV programme.

Damo: How do you define street art? Has your inclusion in Post-Graffiti Pacific changed your view on this?
Route52: I have no idea on how to define street art , I painted graffiti.

Damo: How does it feel to be included in an exhibition among several of your contemporaries?
Route52: It is great to be alongside people I now call my friends, people I looked up to whilst learning the ropes of graffiti and to be here with them now is surreal sometime.

Damo: Did this influence you in any way?
Route52: It totally did, started from the bottom now we are here.

@route52
www.route52.co.nz

‘Post-Graffiti Pacific’ is now on show at aMBUSH Gallery, Central Park, Sydney.

Adnate ‘Could We’ Print Release

Adnate 'Could We' Print Release from Round 3 Creative on Vimeo.

In September 2013, Adnate was personally invited to visit a community located in an isolated area of the central desert in the Northern Territory of Australia. Led by Indigenous Hip Hop Projects and Katherine West Health Board, it was an incredible experience for Adnate to join them on their journey. Adnate spent five nights with the local indigenous community, ‘Pigeon Hole’, also known as Nitjpurru. It was here that Adnate had one of his most important and integral connections with the indigenous peoples of Australia. He experienced first-hand their ancient culture, the immense beauty of their land and the people of Nitjpurru.

During his visit, Adnate was granted permission from the local Elders to photograph the members of this ancient community. After taking over 1,000 photos Adnate selected the most powerful images and painted two murals on buildings within the community. These photos have become the inspirtion to some of the most important work of his career to date being featured in massive murals in countries all over the world. Adnate hopes that this series is able to raise awareness of the Indigenous Australians and their struggle to survive in the modern world.

Adnate has not yet been able to give back directly to the community of Nitjpurru and in the indigenous cultural spirit of sharing wealth within their communities, all proceeds from the sale of this print will be going directly to the local school of ‘Pigeon Hole’. This will directly contribute towards the education and wellbeing of the inspirational children of Nitjpurru.

This is Adnate’s first, hand finished Giclée print. Produced using high quality archival ‘Giclée’ inks by the renowned Dangerfork printing company. All prints have been hand finished with a traditional ‘dressing’ applied to each print individually by the artist.

Prints will be released online at 1pm Friday July 24 (GMT + 10) and will be AU$250 inc GST (includes Australian postage and packaging). Prints will only be available for Australian delivery.

Print is 600mm x 425mm on 310gsm HahneVideo muhle archival paper, hand-finished with Montana Acrylic Ink, Edition of 200. Signed, numbered and uniquely hand-finished by the artist

All Profits going to the Nitjpurru, ‘Pigeon Hole’ Community in the desert of central Northern Territory, Australia

Available exclusively online at Juddy Roller

@adnate

@juddyroller

‘1+1=0′ – DSCREET

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Dscreet’s first Australian show in over 10 years opens this Thursday the 23rd of July at Dangerfork, 1-5 Perry Street, Collingwood.

There will be a glow in the dark print release to coincide with the exhibition and to see this print in all its element and as well as other glow works the atmosphere will be quiet dark.

The show itself has developed into an installation of Dscreet’s teenage life which gives an insight to his warped decision making process.

@dscreetsheet

@dangerfork

Risk – Old Habits Die Hard – Monograph

Legendary Graffiti Writer RISK has released a 350-page monograph. Detroit printmakers, 1xRUN & cultural curator Roger Gastman have joined forces to publish the definitive book on one of the pioneering Los Angeles graffiti originators.

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1xRUN is pleased to present the definitive book on Los Angeles graffiti originator and icon RISK. Old Habits Die Hard recounts a career spanning over four decades with RISK detailing his history, failures, success and of course the many brushes with the law. Old Habits Die Hard is available for purchase online now from – href=”http://www.1xrun.com/runs/Old_Habits_Die_Hard”>www.1xrun.com/runs/Old_Habits_Die_Hard

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‘Post-Graffiti Pacific’ – Askew One

As part of ‘Post-Graffiti Pacific’ currently on show at aMBUSH Gallery in Sydney’s Central Park we have been lucky enough to have a quick Q&A with some of the contributing artists. To begin this ongoing series we present to you, Askew One.

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With a strong self-taught background in graffiti, graphic design and videography, Askew One’s geographical isolation of Auckland, New Zealand, hasn’t held him back from presenting his work to the world and he is now considered to be one of the leading figures of graffiti and urban contemporary art from the Pacific region.

Using skills in photography, graphic design, graffiti and traditional painting, Askew One captures his audience with visually complex and pleasing paintings whilst drawing attention to the economic and environmental issues affecting the smaller Pacific nations of Oceania.

Damo: What does it mean to you to be part of Post-Graffiti Pacific?
Askew One: I’m stoked to see this show come to fruition. From many late night debates amongst my friends over drinks, trying to define who we are as artists to first connecting with the aMBUSH guys and them giving this chance to share this revelation.

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Miron Milic’s mural gets buffed for ridiculous reasons

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Participating at the local Indirekt festival, Miron Milic recently spent couple of days painting in a Croatian coastal town of Umag. Working on a facade of the local elementary school, Croatian artist created a meaningful piece that combines illustration and text, as most of his works.

Inspired by the ecological principles on which this particular school is based, the work is showing two hands counting the 4 major R’s of sustainability – Reuse, Reduce, Recycle, Reinvent. While obviously positive and encouraging in its core, the mural ended up being completely misread and misjudged by the local hot heads obsessed with nationalism and times past. Instead of seeing the important message that the kids should remember and use through their life, frustrated individuals, including the school principal, saw 3 opened fingers which reminded them of the gesture that Serbian radicals were showing during the war on the Balkans few decades ago. Sadly, this was good enough reason for the principal of the school to selfishly order the buffing of the work by an academic painter only 3 days after it’s completion. Luckily, few days after the incident the town mayor apologized to the artist and invited him to come and paint a new mural.

Milic’s Behance profile

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